Talk to DP Forum

Lauren & Stuart

July 30, 2015

Dear Daniel,
Way back in 1997, a fellow named Jeff asked for your fabulous mashed potato recipe %u2014 but you, tragically, had forgotten it.
Fortunately, my husband wrote it down all those ages ago and we made it every Thanksgiving for decades. Unfortunately, we lost the recipe when we moved. We came to your website hoping to find it, but alas!
So, we searched diligently through all our piles of scribbled recipes and %u2014 alleluia %u2014 we found it!
Here's the ingredients:
2 Leeks
Sun-dried tomatoes
Olive oil
Lemon juice
Cumen
Salt

Bon Appetite ~

Lauren & Stuart

Daniel replies:

Sounds yummy. Thank you. This is another proof of my conviction that if you sit around doing practically nothing for long enough the answer to every question will be revealed.

Michael

July 26, 2015

Phillip K. Dick is often praised for his prescience, a visionary quality which among others, sets him on an Olympus of speculative fiction writers. (I myself concur with this assessment, although I consider his greatest quality to be that his work was always first and foremost about the human condition.)

Well folks, Daniel M. Pinkwater is another such Olympian%u2014not only for his lighthearted take on the human condition in work that, like Twain, can be enjoyed by all ages%u2014but also, like Dick, for his prescience.

Who else but Pinkwater was predicting almost 40 years ago that the Avocado milkshake would one day be enjoyed by millions of Westerners? It's true that back then we didn't know they would be called "smoothies" and "bubble tea", yet it is undeniable that these wonderful and healthy confections have become firmly established in the gustatory rotation of the discerning consumer, both gourmet and gourmand, and continue to grow ever more popular.

Kudos to you, Mr. Pinkwater!

PS
Do you know where I can get some Dr. Nut soda? (It has long been my dream to try some, and I heard you might have a line on a secret stash 😉

Daniel replies:

I've been under the impression that Dr. Nut was one of those urban myths--like gluten-free pizza. But, it's likely some other visitors to this site will have specific information.

Jenny Smith

July 7, 2015

Dear Mr. Pinkwater,

Let me just begin by telling you that I have enjoyed your books for years. You are single handedly responsible for opening my eyes to clam chowder with coffee, as well as a deep love of baked potatoes slathered with salt and butter. I am now enjoying sharing your stories with my young sons, aged 4 &5. Henrietta and the blue moose have captured their hearts. With that being said, whenever anyone mentions Chicago, you are the first person I think of. My family and I are taking a trip this summer that will give us one day in Chicago. If you were to spend only one day in Chicago with two little boys that aren't into video games but can recite Dr. Seuss and a husband who wants nothing more than a legitimite Chicago dog, where would you go? Thank you for all you do!

Daniel replies:

Actually, I have not been in Chicago for 25 years, so I don't know which is the hot hot dog stand. If I had one day to show someone the sights, I would pick the Art Institute, and the interior floors of the Fine Arts Building, across the street more or less. At the same time, the architecture and the look of the Loop. Ask any fat person where to get the best hot dog. Or, the Lincoln Park Zoo.

Beatrice Red Star Fletcher

July 7, 2015

Mr. Pinkwater,

I really like your books, my father has read almost all of them to me. We are currently reading The Worms of Kukumlima. We are considering naming our next dog Fafner. Are you going to write a new book? If so what will it be about? I have two dogs and a cat, the cat's name is Mr. coconut.

Thank you, and let me know if you ever visit Portland, Oregon.

From Beatrice Red Star Fletcher

Daniel replies:

Thank you for liking my books, and telling me that you do. Please give my best wishes to your father, the two dogs, and Mr. Coconut. Yes, I am going to write a new book, and no, I do not know what it is about....yet, but I have a few ideas.

Ann Nappa

July 7, 2015

Hello Mr. Pinkwater. I'm just saying hi and wishing you a great day– cause I think you are awesome! Thanks for all the great stuff you have added to my time on the planet!! :)

Daniel replies:

Wow. Thanks. You are awesome yourself.

Mrs. Lollos fourth grade class

June 16, 2015

Why did you decide to write books rather than any other job?

Daniel replies:

This is very easy to answer. There are two answers: 1. Because I wasn't any good at any other job. 2. Because writing is more fun than any other job. I will expand Answer 2. to say that I have had many adventures. I have been all over the world, I have climbed mountains, I have faced wild lions, I have met famous and interesting people. Writing is more fun than any of those things.

Kevin

June 7, 2015

I noticed on your twitter the other day that you mentioned finishing a first draft. Is this for a new continuation of the Neddiad/Yggyssey/Catwiskered/Bushman sort-of series? Any possibility that you will be serializing online again?

Thank you,

Kevin

Daniel replies:

No, it's something else, shorter. In the present corporate climate, I don't seem to be able to sell a novel as I sold all the others, with an advance in advance. Now they want to see a whole manuscript, or a goodly chunk plus an outline, before they will make a deal. I will share with you that in my experience book publishers tend to be strangely inartistic and venal. I happen to be in a position to avoid putting finished work before an undereducated office worker who will convey the decision of some committee thus, "We'd like to publish this, on condition that you listen to our pathetic and unintelligent suggestions, and agree to make changes--in fact, show us the work incorporating our disgusting ideas, and then we'll pay." I may serialize or weblish something in the future, but for now my good agent has found me a couple of editors with 3-digit IQs, and I can turn a dollar doing picture books and chapters books, which is pleasant and satisfying.

ACG

May 25, 2015

Dear Mr. Pinkwater,

My wife grew up reading “The Big Orange Splot” and we love reading it to our 3 year old son. We live in Somerville, MA and there is this amazing building called the Museum of Modern Renaissance (see pic: www.eman8.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/Front.jpeg ). Every time we pass it we all shout “There’s Mr. Plumbean’s house!” That place truly looks like all of their dreams.

Daniel replies:

Cool!

Mike Duguay

May 17, 2015

Mr. Pinkwater,
I have carefully molding, shaping, and otherwise opening the minds of the 4th grade youth of my fine community in Vermont for the past 20 yrs, in part by reading aloud Lizard Music at the start of the year and Borgel near the end. In between I read other stuff, but that's not important now.
Several of my students (who discovered our schools's vast Pinkwater collection) have noticed that you returned to the world of the Hoboken Chicken Emergency and wrote additional stories after some time.
Their question ( and mine), will there be more Chicken man/Victor/Lizard stories or Borgel/Melvin/Fafner stories?

Please?

Daniel replies:

Mr. Duguay -- If you've been carefully molding and shaping and otherwise opening the minds of fourth-graders for 20 years, probably some of them are in the 24th grade by this time, and may blame you for how things have turned out. Wouldn't it make sense to randomly mold, shape and open, and that way you could tell them, "Hey, it's not my fault you happened to read those goofy books when you were younger." But that is none of my business. I will answer your question: It is not a matter of what I may write, but what I may write that gets published. If a book isn't published, nobody will ever see it, so why bother to write it when I could be taking a nap instead? It used to be that publishers were people who published books. Now they are more like corporations that publish books. There is a subtle difference. Without going into details, I can tell you that it is less possible for me to predict what I will be writing in the future. However, I expect to be writing some kinds of things, and there are some books written in the recent past I can recommend. Please salute your inquisitive students for me.

Jennifer Garrigan and The Big Cheese Kindergarten Class

May 17, 2015

"Today we read the The Big Orange Spot. We loved it and wanted you to know!!" Love The Big Cheeses

*I had not read this book before in my classroom. Thank you for writing and illustrating such a nice book about dreams and how important it is to be an individual.

Daniel replies:

Thank you very much for liking my book! I think it is great that cheese can go to kindergarten.