Talk to DP Forum

Adrienne

February 10, 2016

My class LOVES when I read aloud Larry books. We have all of them. Larry has a surfer accent and is our favorite polar bear. Tomorrow we are going to have a Larry Day with lap bongos, student created Larry stories and silliness. Thanks!

Daniel replies:

I think Larry talking like a surfer is perfect! Have a great Larry Day!

eKo

February 10, 2016

Hi hi, this is in a similar vein to what Diana H has written. I was a little surprised to see her message.
I too, loved David Bowie from about the age of 12, and have been shocked by his departure. I\'m 42 now. He was my guru. You are also my guru, maybe have been for even longer. I came here because I wanted to say thank you.

I read Lizard Music first, then pretty much everything else you've written. I don't know why some of us are naturally inclined towards having (for lack of a better word) Buddhist-Tantrica-Sci-Fi souls, but here we are. Thank you for helping to nurture mine.

I wish you all the best,
Thank you,
erin Ko

Daniel replies:

I'm not in the guru business. What I am is an artist. When you say I'm your guru what I think you are really saying is that you've been able to make something of personal importance prompted by experience of art I did. That's not necessarily what I had in mind, but when art is made right it's possible for a creative person to use it like that. Naturally, I'm happy when such a thing happens, but truthfully, I'm willing to settle for someone being entertained or diverted. It's to your credit that you've been able to bring something to my work that makes it more than that, for you. What I'm suggesting is that it is for me, and David Bowie, to thank you.

Patsey Manning

February 6, 2016

I just listened to your classic Car Talk piece, A Car Talk Christmas Carol. A bit late, I know. But it is wonderfully funny, delightfully silly. Thanks for being an originally wacky thinker and author. The NPR gang does your work proud!

Daniel replies:

Thank you. NPR was fun back in the day.

Friends School 1A

February 6, 2016

Hi Mr. Pinkwater!!
We are a class of 1st graders in Baltimore, MD and we have some questions for you. Why do you like pudding? Why do you put polar bears in your books? How do you get your ideas? Where did you get your idea for bears stealing muffins? We have really enjoyed your books! Your stories make us laugh and we think they are very imaginative. Thank you!!

Daniel replies:

Polar bears like pudding very much. If you meet a polar bear, and do not want it to eat you...and if you have pudding...you will be all right. If you do not have pudding, I am sorry to tell you that you will be eaten...unless you have muffins. Most polar bears will accept muffins instead of children, or pudding, as something to eat. And this is why I put polar bears in many of my books--it is to share important information. Some day you may meet a polar bear, and of course you will have pudding or muffins to share with it, and you will not be eaten. Then you will say, "I am certainly glad I read that book!"

Ross Family

February 4, 2016

You. Are. Fully. AWESOME!!! My children were over the moon that you replied to us. Thank you for being so obliging. Seriously, you do inspire young writers; at least two in this family. Thank you!

Daniel replies:

I can see how I might possibly inspire young writers...it would be the same way that certain writers have inspired me. The writers who have inspired me are ones who appear to be having fun writing. I have fun writing, and some people are probably able to notice this. Writers who do not inspire me are ones who seem to be suffering, and deal with sad, scary and horrible things, and worry a lot. Perfectly fine writers, some of these, just not inspiring to me. This is not to say that I am not a serious writer. It is not to say that. I would never say that. Writers who are not serious are not taken seriously, and make far less money. I am quite serious, ok?

The Ross Family

January 30, 2016

We just got back from the 'Bat Hat festival' and after sitting down for a dinner of Avocados and Dr. Pedwee''s Grape Soda we were reminded of all the times we have listened to your awesome voice reading books to us. We go on a lot of family trips and you are our go to guy. We range in age from 48 to 9 years old. There are six of us and we all agree you are one Jolly Old Top. Seriously, thank you for hours of laughter and wonder. Your voice is a treasure and your words unique …. Here's to all fruit bats everywhere and having urban experiences. If you are ever in the Seattle area we would love to meet you or just hear you read. How do you come up with such outlandish dialogue? Are some of these characters people that you have actually met?

Daniel replies:

What's outlandish about it? It's just the way people I have actually met talk. Maybe it's different in Seattle.

Diana H

January 28, 2016

Dear Mr. Pinkwater,

Hello. You may be surprised to read that I am writing you bring David Bowie recently died. David Bowie has been an inspiration to me since I was 12 and I am now 45. In addition to being a wonderful artist, he represented to me, and taught me about, being free and creative and curious and bold and uncompromising. I really liked being in a world where David Bowie existed and it seems so sad that he is gone. Which bring me to you… You also had a big influence on me when I was young. My dad read Alan Mendelsohn to me when I was in first grade and I absolutely adored it. I have re-read it about every 5 years and it never lets me down. So many of the lessons I needed to learn in life are in that book, and so many things that charmed me then in first grade still charm me today. (I've read many other books of yours and they are great too. I'm still trying to get my kids on board but I know I will crack them one day because they are awesome and kooky kids.) Thank you for your work and for speaking in your voice in a way that is both uncompromising and filled with joy. And I hope your remain in the world, healthy and happy, for a long time to come! Best, Diana

Daniel replies:

No, I'm not surprised at all. Whenever we lose an artist it's natural to look around and see who's left. Many. The world has its problems, but not having people who can share their vision isn't one of them.

Holden

January 24, 2016

Hi, my name is Holden. I am 8-years-old, and I am wondering if you are going to write a fourth Noodlekugel book. I like your books because they are fun and good for families. So, I am just wondering if there will be another book. Thank you for writing the books.

Daniel replies:

Thanks for asking. No, there will not be a fourth Noodlekugel book. This is not my fault. Publishers make these decisions--they are the ones who print and sell books. Publishers used to be people who actually liked books, and made a reasonable amount of money printing and selling them. Now they are companies that are interested in too much money very fast. Even though many people like the Noodlekugel books, I think the company had already decided to stop the series when the first one had just barely been published. I hope you'll look around for other books of mine--maybe you'll find others you like.

Rafe

January 24, 2016

Want to know something silly? Me and you have the same birth day!

Daniel replies:

That is completely silly! Are you a genius too?

Craig Bigelow

January 20, 2016

Dear Mr. Pinkwater,
I really enjoyed reading The Big Orange Splot. My brother got it our family’s copy from his third grade teacher back in 1993. In high school, I did a children’s literature course where I had to read one hundred children’s books and complete a related project. I decided to make a quilt inspired by your book. I always thought it would be cool to somehow show it to you but never realized you had a forum like this. Anyway, here is a picture of me finishing the quilt in 2005 and a picture of it all finished. Thank you for inspiring me and my family with your book!

Sincerely,
Craig Bigelow

Daniel replies:

That sounds like a great high school course, and you made a great quilt!  Thanks for showing it.